E.coli Bacteria Detected in Grand Canyon National Park Water Supply

E.coli bacteria have been detected in the water supply within Arizona’s Grand Canyon National Park, according to an advisory released by the National Park Service (NPS).

Friday’s announcement warned visitors to Phantom Ranch, a lodge at the bottom of the South Rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona, to boil their water before using it.

“These bacteria can make you sick and are a particular concern for people with weakened immune systems,” the NPS stated.

“Bacterial contamination can occur when increased runoff enters the drinking water source (for example, after heavy rain),” he also said.

“It can also occur due to a break in the distribution system (pipes) or a failure in the water treatment process.”

All water should be boiled for one minute per 1,000 feet of elevation to kill bacteria before using it for drinking, brushing teeth, washing dishes, making ice or cooking, the NPS recommended.

Bottled water can also be used as an alternative.

At this time, E. coli has not been found in any other areas outside of Phantom Ranch.

The National Park Service said in its announcement that it is taking steps to control the situation, including making “control system adjustments” and restarting the chlorination process. AFP via Getty Images

What is E. coli?

E.coli, officially known as Escherichia coli, is a type of bacteria found in the environment, food, and the intestines of people and animals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Some strains can make people sick, with symptoms including, but not limited to, severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting, respiratory illness, urinary tract infections, and pneumonia.

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Symptoms usually start three to four days after eating or drinking something that contains E. coli, but can start as soon as a day or as long as 10 days later.

A laboratory technician holds a bacterial culture showing a positive enterohaemorrhagic E. coli infection, also known as EHEC bacteria, from a patient at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf on June 2, 2011 in Hamburg, Germany.A lab technician holds a bacteria culture showing a positive enterohaemorrhagic E. coli infection, also known as EHEC bacteria, from a patient at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf on June 2, 2011 in Hamburg, Germany.Getty images

While most people recover on their own within five to seven days, some experience serious illness that requires medical attention.

The CDC recommends seeing a health care provider for “diarrhea that lasts more than three days or diarrhea accompanied by a fever greater than 102°F, bloody diarrhea, or vomiting so much that you cannot keep fluids down and expel very little.” urine.”

Although rare, some people with E. coli can develop hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can lead to kidney failure or other life-threatening complications, according to the CDC.

All water should be boiled for one minute per 1,000 feet of elevation to kill bacteria before using it for drinking, brushing teeth, washing dishes, making ice or cooking, the NPS recommended.All water should be boiled for one minute per 1,000 feet of elevation to kill bacteria before using it for drinking, brushing teeth, washing dishes, making ice or cooking, the NPS recommended. BSIP/Universal Images Group via

HUS symptoms include extreme fatigue, decreased urination, and loss of color in the face and lower eyelids.

The National Park Service said in its announcement that it is taking steps to control the situation, including making “control system adjustments” and restarting the chlorination process.

“We are increasing sampling for coliform bacteria to determine the source of the contamination,” the announcement said.

“We will let you know when tests show no bacteria and you no longer need to boil your water.”

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People are encouraged to share the notice with anyone in the area who may be exposed to this water.

For guidelines on how to reduce the risk of infection by microbes, people can call the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

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Source: vtt.edu.vn

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